A hearing aid is a small electronic device that you wear in or behind your ear. It makes some sounds louder. A hearing aid can help people hear more in both quiet and noisy situations.

Hearing aids help people who have hearing loss from damage to the small sensory cells in the inner ear. The damage can occur as a result of disease, aging, or injury from noise or certain medicines. Only about one out of five people who would benefit from a hearing aid actually uses one. If you think a hearing aid could help you, visit your doctor.

Many consumers are unsure where to find professional help with their hearing. Our highly trained staff provides hearing health care in a manner that provides you with the information that you need for a successful hearing aid experience.

Most adults with hearing loss can be helped with hearing aids. Choosing the right hearing aid can be difficult. There is an enormous amount of information regarding hearing aids and the choices can be daunting. Choosing an Audiologist who can guide you through this process is the first critical decision in purchasing hearing aids.

Of course, the first step to a successful hearing aid experience is an accurate audiological evaluation or hearing test. Equally important is a determination regarding your specific needs and lifestyle. It is critical to convey this information to the hearing health care professional. Finally, everyone has a budget. Your budgetary constraints should be discussed. Hearing aids are rarely covered by insurance.

Evaluation : At the time of the hearing evaluation a case history will be taken to determine the type of hearing problem that the individual perceives and how his/her family perceives the hearing problem. Questions will also be asked about the onset of the hearing loss, presence of tinnitus (ringing in the ears) and dizziness. Based on the results of the hearing test and the answers to these questions Our highly trained staff may make a referral to a medical doctor for an examination and possible treatment. If the testing reveals a sensori-neural hearing loss, a hearing aid may be recommended for one or both ears.

Hearing Aid Evaluation: There are literally thousands of hearing aids from which to choose. Our highly trained staff will use the information that was provided in the case history and in the audiological evaluation to help narrow those choices for you. The final decision on which hearing aid is purchased is the choice of the wearer. The main types of hearing aids available today are Analog and Digital.

Digital Hearing Aid Technology: Digital technology accounts for most of the hearing aids sold today. In fact, the basic digital hearing aid costs about the same as the conventional analog hearing aid. The digital hearing aid contains a computer chip that amplifies sounds digitally. The quality of the sound produced by the computer chip is excellent.

There are different kinds of hearing aids. They differ by size, their placement on or inside the ear, and how much they amplify sound. The hearing aid that will work best for you depends on what kind of hearing loss you have, and how severe it is.

Hearing Aids Styles

Invisible-In-The-Canal (IIC)

  • For mild to moderately severe hearing loss
  • Completely invisible in most ears
  • Custom-made for you

Receiver-In-The-Canal (RIC)

  • For mild to moderately severe hearing loss
  • Leaves the ear open
  • Reduced or no “plugged up” feeling
  • Sleek design barely visible when worn

Behind-The-Ear (BTE)

  • Appropriate for almost all types of hearing loss
  • Custom earpiece is molded to fit your outer ear
  • Discreet design

Completely-In-The-Canal (CIC)

  • For mild to moderate hearing loss
  • Virtually undetectable
  • Placement within the ear cuts down on wind noise

Half Shell In-The-Ear (ITE)

  • For mild to severe hearing loss
  • Fits directly into external ear
  • Inserted and adjusted with ease

Half Shell In-The-Ear (ITE)

  • For mild to severe hearing loss
  • Fits directly into external ear
  • Inserted and adjusted with ease